Osteopathy

Managing Time and Health

Today’s society places ever-increasing demands on our time. With the pressures of juggling career, domestic tasks, managing finances, and caring for loved ones, it can be difficult to concentrate on our own health.

It is often only when our health begins to suffer and our body starts to send out alarm signals forcing us to slow down, that we truly begin to focus on ourselves.

However, by making time for yourself every day, to eat healthily, exercise and focus on your inner wellbeing, you will ultimately reduce your risk of developing a variety of serious health conditions. Not only will this benefit your health long-term, but also by spending time on you, you ensure that you continue to be there for those you love for years to come.

The Role of Osteopathy

Osteopathy is a distinctive and complete system of healthcare with an emphasis on the diagnosis and treatment of the person, as a whole, in the context of their lives.

It recognises that many of the problems we have may stem from structural or mechanical factors causing our body to function in a way it isn’t really designed to. This may also worsen underlying conditions.

By gathering information from a detailed case history and careful physical examination, it is possible for Osteopaths to form a medical diagnosis and comprehensive appraisal of your current problem.

Osteopaths provide a friendly, professional treatment and advice, individually tailored to the individual.

Treatment involves gentle, manual techniques such as soft tissue massage, movement and manipulation of joints and cranial osteopathy – a gentle release of the tension, tenderness, restriction or strain within the body, using a highly developed sense of touch called palpation.

Its aim is to ease pain, reduce swelling and improve mobility in order to allow the body’s innate healing ability to restore function and therefore health.

Osteopaths receive a minimum of a 4-year degree training and are strictly regulated by the General Osteopathic Council. Continued Professional Development is also a requirement in order to keep knowledge and skills up to date. This allows a high standard of treatment of the whole body.

Osteopathy is suitable for all ages from newborn to our very senior population.

Osteopaths are able to specialise, at post-graduate level, in specific areas such as Paediatrics (including children with additional needs), Sports, Trauma and Anxiety, Naturopathy and even Animals (equine and small animals).

Many Osteopaths belong to and work at the heart of a community, treating whole families (and even their pets).

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Managing Time and Health

Today’s society places ever-increasing demands on our time. With the pressures of juggling career, domestic tasks, managing finances, and caring for loved ones, it can be difficult to concentrate on our own health.

It is often only when our health begins to suffer and our body starts to send out alarm signals forcing us to slow down, that we truly begin to focus on ourselves.

However, by making time for yourself every day, to eat healthily, exercise and focus on your inner wellbeing, you will ultimately reduce your risk of developing a variety of serious health conditions. Not only will this benefit your health long-term, but also by spending time on you, you ensure that you continue to be there for those you love for years to come.

The Role of Osteopathy

Osteopathy is a distinctive and complete system of healthcare with an emphasis on the diagnosis and treatment of the person, as a whole, in the context of their lives.

It recognises that many of the problems we have may stem from structural or mechanical factors causing our body to function in a way it isn’t really designed to. This may also worsen underlying conditions.

By gathering information from a detailed case history and careful physical examination, it is possible for Osteopaths to form a medical diagnosis and comprehensive appraisal of your current problem.

Osteopaths provide a friendly, professional treatment and advice, individually tailored to the individual.

Treatment involves gentle, manual techniques such as soft tissue massage, movement and manipulation of joints and cranial osteopathy – a gentle release of the tension, tenderness, restriction or strain within the body, using a highly developed sense of touch called palpation.

Its aim is to ease pain, reduce swelling and improve mobility in order to allow the body’s innate healing ability to restore function and therefore health.

Osteopaths receive a minimum of a 4-year degree training and are strictly regulated by the General Osteopathic Council. Continued Professional Development is also a requirement in order to keep knowledge and skills up to date. This allows a high standard of treatment of the whole body.

Osteopathy is suitable for all ages from newborn to our very senior population.

Osteopaths are able to specialise, at post-graduate level, in specific areas such as Paediatrics (including children with additional needs), Sports, Trauma and Anxiety, Naturopathy and even Animals (equine and small animals).

Many Osteopaths belong to and work at the heart of a community, treating whole families (and even their pets).

Associated Practitioners:

Nigel Utton

At NU Osteopathy we offer a holistic osteopathic treatment which can range from a very gentle… Read more

Deirdre Nazareth

I use manual therapy and functional medicine to treat clients with chronic conditions. I offer functional… Read more